Interactive watershed

Description

The interactive Watershed Fiji plugin provides an interactive way to explore local maxima and threshold values while a resulting label map is updated on the fly.

After the user has found a reliable parameter configuration, it is possible to apply the same parameters to other images in a headless mode, for example via ImageJ macro scripting.

Cell or particle counting and scoring the percentage of stained objects

Description

This one example workflow from the Cell Profiler(CP)  Examples . CP is commonly used to count cells or other objects as well as percent-positives, by measuring the per-cell staining intensity. This pipeline shows how to do both of these tasks, and demonstrates how various modules may be used to accomplish the same result. 

In a few words, it used the IdentifyPrimaryObject module of CellProfiler to detect nuclei from a channel (e.g DAPI), then again the same module on another channel to detect another probe (e.g some particular histone)  .

Then objects (nuclei) are related to the second object (Histone), to create a parent child-relation ship: where nuclei can have histone has child. Nuclei are then filtered according to the property of having histone (positive) or not having histone (negtiveobject) related to them.  If needed, nuclei can be expanded in order to include touching object rather than object inside only.

The percentage of positive nuclei vs total number of nuclei can then be computed using the CalculateMath Module.

Positivepercentcell

PHANTAST for FIJI

Description

 

The phase contrast microscopy segmentation toolbox (PHANTAST) is a collection of open-source algorithms and tools for the processing of phase contrast microscopy (PCM) images. It was developed at University College London's department of Biochemical Engineering and CoMPLEX.

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Orbit

Description

Orbit Image Analysis is a free open source software with the focus to quantify big images like whole slide scans.

It can connect to image servers, e.g. Omero.
Analysis can be done on your local computer or via scaleout functionality in a distrubuted computing environment like a Spark cluster.

Sophisticated image analysis algorithms incl. tissue quantification using machine learning, object segmentation and classification are build in. In addition a versatile API allows you to enhance Orbit and to run your own scripts.

Orbit

MAARS

Description

automated open-source image acquisition and on-the-fly analysis pipeline (initially developped for analysis of mitotic defects in fission yeast)

maars workflow from publication

 

maars

Adipocyte quantification ImageJ by Baecker

Description

The Adipocytes Tools help to analyze fat cells in images from histological section. This is a rather general cell segmentation approach. It can be adapted to different situations via the parameters. This means that you have to find the right parameters for your application.

Sample Image: [0178_x5_3.tif](http://dev.mri.cnrs.fr/attachments/190/0178_x5_3.tif)

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Adipocyte quantification MATLAB

Description

Analysis of adipocyte number and size. The original code and example images supposed to be discovered at http://webspace.buckingham.ac.uk/klanglands/ but currently the webpage is missing the code and sample images.

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EBImage

Description

EBImage provides general purpose functionality for image processing and analysis. In the context of (high-throughput) microscopy-based cellular assays, EBImage offers tools to segment cells and extract quantitative cellular descriptors. This allows the automation of such tasks using the R programming language and facilitates the use of other tools in the R environment for signal processing, statistical modeling, machine learning and visualization with image data.

EBImage is available through the Bioconductor software project (www.bioconductor.org). Strengths Lightweight Suitable for automated, scripted analyses All functions are documented with examples Modular links to R and Bioconductor software, notably imageHTS and cellHTS2 Community support via the Bioconductor mailing list Reproducible (image) analysis using the Sweave report-writing system

EBImage

QuimP

Description

Summary

QuimP is software for tracking cellular shape changes and dynamic distributions of fluorescent reporters at the cell membrane. QuimP's unique selling point is the possibility to aggregate data from many cells in form of spatio-temporal maps of dynamic events, independently of cell size and shape. QuimP has been successfully applied to address a wide range of problems related to cell movement in many different cell types. 

Introduction

In transmembrane signalling the cell membrane plays a fundamental role in localising intracellular signalling components to specific sites of action, for example to reorganise the actomyosin cortex during cell polarisation and locomotion. The localisation of different components can be directly or indirectly visualised using fluorescence microscopy, for high-throughput screening commonly in 2D. A quantitative understanding demands segmentation and tracking of whole cells and fluorescence signals associated with the moving cell boundary, for example those associated with actin polymerisation at the cell front of locomoting cells. As regards segmentation, a wide range of methods can be used (threshold based, region growing, active contours or level sets) to obtain closed cell contours, which then are used to sample fluorescence adjacent to the cell edge in a straightforward manner. The most critical step however is cell edge tracking, which links points on contours at time t to corresponding points at t+1. Optical flow methods have been employed, but usually fail to meet the requirement that total fluorescence must not change. QuimP uses a method (ECMM, electrostatic contour migration method (Tyson et al., 2010) which has been shown to outperform traditional level set methods. ECMM minimises the sum of path lengths connecting all pairs of points, equivalent to minimising the energy required for cell deformation. The original segmentation based on an active contour method and outline tracking algorithms have been described in (Dormann et al., 2002; Tyson et al., 2010; Tyson et al., 2014).

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